Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Classic Pencil Skirt with Vent

This weekend I finished the pencil skirt with a vent, inspired by the  Cupcake Goddess's tutorials which instruct how to put a vent plus lining into a pencil skirt.



Most skirt patterns include a vent, but the patterns don't call for a lining (isn't that obnoxious on the part of the Big 4 patterns?  Obviously, if the pattern suggests wool, it must be lined in most cases.)  If you've never lined a skirt with a vent before, it does take some mental work to figure out how to do it. 

My skirt was different from the tutorial's model - the Burda Jenny - as McCall's 3830 does not have a waistband.  These are the slightly different steps I took to construct the skirt:
  1. I inserted the invisible zipper into the fashion fabric.
  2. Attached the fashion fabric and lining at the waistband.
  3. Finished the bottom of the vent from the inside.
That method was suggested by Connie Long in her Easy Guide to Sewing Linings (partly accessible on Google Books).  Putting the vent's right sides together inside the skirt, I took a guess at what vent seams should be sewn together, and it worked.    




A commentor indicated that her skirt pulled once the lining was attached at the waist; I recalled that Eugenia countered this by adding "wearing ease" to her vented skirt's lining, so I drafted my skirt's lining this way as well.  As Eugenia noted, it doesn't make the inside very pretty, but I don't have unsightly pulling issues when I walk.




As you can see, it was difficult to get the puzzle piece part of the lining to ease in, so that part doesn't look very pretty either, and the edge is pulling up a bit.   Hopefully I can perfect that in future versions.




I'm so pleased with how this skirt turned out.  I've started taking more time and care on my projects - serging the fashion fabric, pinking lining edges, sewing all possible seams in the same direction - and the results have been more satisfying to me. 

* * *

I'm suddenly in a skirt mood, so I have a few in the immediate queue.  Though I ordered a vintage dress pattern, and it's calling my name, too.  There just aren't enough hours in the day!

24 comments:

Faye Lewis said...

I think you did a great job! That is one of my favorite skirt patterns.

Carolyn (cmarie12) said...

"I've started taking more time and care on my projects"

That's the answer, right there! Now that you know the answer to the question...I think you should go for it! This skirt is a great beginning and you will see that as you make each one, you will gain more confidence with your skills. I'm looking forward to encouraging you on this journey. You are doing fantastic...wear your skirt with pride!

Ali said...

This turned out beautifully! What a wonderful wardrobe staple, and I'm inspired by the time and care you put into it. :)

Maggie said...

Great job! It looks fantastic and you can never go wrong with a classic skirt like that.

toy said...

looks great

Lisa said...

What a classic piece , you'll get so much milage out of this skirt . I think I need to follow your lead in putting more effort into each piece.

Karin said...

It looks great! Inside and out! I am working on a simple skirt (no vent) out of tweed with no lining in the pattern. I am trying to line it myself, but I have no experience. I have taken note of your resource tips. Thanks!

Lady Cherry said...

It hangs beautifully. I have got some black garbadine fabric with pencil skirt written all over it, so thank you for the helpful tips. x

Eugenia said...

You have done a wonderful job with this beautiful classic skirt. It's a great fit, I think it is pegged just right and it hangs perfectly. I am glad that you found Connie Long's guidance useful - her book is one of my very favourite resources. Looking forward to seeing more skirts from you......

Linda said...

Great job and timely reading on my part. I have a dress pattern that the skirt part has a vent. I am never ever able to make the vent lining like RTW. And the sad thing is that I have Connie Long's book that I have used for numerous lining projects but have not used it for skirts???? Your skirt looks great!

The Cupcake Goddess said...

Oh its just gorgeous! The fabric you chose is just exquisite and I'm so glad you braved the vent tutorials! I think they really paid off and the professional result is just fabulous! What a lovely lovely addition to your wardrobe.

Clio said...

Looks great! Clothing really looks so much better when it is lined - it really irks me about the Big 4, too. You did a great job.

MushyWear said...

This turned out lovely. I just adore the fabric and the lining. It does feel good to accomplish new techniques and to grow in our satisfaction with the things we make. Great job!

K.Line said...

Looks fabulous! Lovely skirt.

amber said...

Absolutely beautiful! You look fantastic in it!

Angela said...

What a great skirt! You look fantastic in it!

Haylee said...

Looks fantastic! Great job. This is exactly what I need to make next as my wardrobe is desperately in need of some basics.

Karin van D. said...

That's a fabulous skirt. And it looks so good on you. Great job!

gwensews said...

You're doing a great job. There is a fantastic book on linings, called "Easy Guide to Sewing Linings" by Connie Long that is invaluable.

Sheila said...

Great skirt and love the blouse you paired with it. Now that you've mentioned Connie Long's book... I remember ordering it in ebook format... now I need to remember where I saved it.

Thanks for the awesome compliment on my sweater jacket. Coats & Clarks has a great cd: Crochet Made Easy and very user friendly.. you will enjoy it.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

What a lovely vent! I've always cheated on my vent linings and just cut a big upside down oval out of the lining so it won't flash through the vent and left it at that. Perhaps I should try something a little classier...

Carolyn said...

Your skirt is looking good!
Thankyou for your comment. Yes, "bathers" is the term used to describe swimwear in Australia. Don't you use it there? What do you use instead?

Faye Lewis said...

I've wanted to make the Spanish Snap buttonhole since I first got the book Couture, the Art of Fine Sewing by Roberta Carr. The reason I wanted to try them is they are similar to the bound ones, they have really tiny lips though. AND ARE SO MUCH EASIER AND QUICKER,but yield a pretty professional result. Carr says they are also referred to as Invisible Bound buttonholes. Do you have her book?

Anonymous said...

Love love love the skirt, it's perfect, and it looks great on you. Did you also sew the top?